SalmonTag2

No Forests, No Salmon

The relationship between salmon and trees is like that of mother and child: without one, the other does not exist.

Trees, forests, are essential to the survival of wild salmon. Without them, the water tributaries where the salmon return every year to spawn would not be able to keep the salmon eggs alive. Trees offer shade over the waters to keep the temperature cool for the salmon eggs. After spawning, the bodies of the salmon  feed those trees rich nutrients brought from the oceans through the soil as the bodies decompose into the earth, carried into the forests by the bears and wolves that live there. For this cycle to continue it is essential that the forests remain healthy and all of its elements intact.

Unfortunately, many logging industries see trees as dollar bills, not as an important part of an inticate and sensitive ecosystem. Clearcut logging practices damage this essential relationship between trees and salmon with every forest that is taken down. The clear cuts at the Stuart Lakes can be seen by outer space with the naked eye. The Stuart Lake salmon have been declining for three decades. Government forestry reports say there is no impact to salmon, but in spite of at least two decades of self-imposed fishing restrictions by First Nations on the Stuart runs, those salmon are not recovering in their silt-laden streams which were once spawning grounds. The fine sediment kicked-down into streams by logging operations (which uproot the soil and cause it to run on the rain into the streams) punctures the salmon eggs.

clear cut

In the Great Bear Rainforest, there has been an ongoing battle to protect the forests that have been under threat for years. The industry claims to be operating within compliance, yet the evidence of destruction left behind speaks to horrible neglect and impact.  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2011/06/28/bc-great-bear-clearcut-timberwest.html

li-bc-110628-great-bear-clearcut

 

myth1myth2myth3LThe relationship between salmon and trees is like that of mother and child; without one, the other does not exist.

Trees, forests are essential to the survival of wild salmon. Without them, the spawning grounds where the salmon return every year would not be able to keep the salmon eggs alive. Trees offer shade over the waters to keep the temperature cool for the salmon eggs. The bodies of the salmon after they have spawned feed those trees nutrients through the soil as the bodies decompose into the earth.

logging 1

http://www.salmonnation.com/animations/fsc/index.html